Blaydon Urgent Treatment Centre is closed on Saturday 4th and Sunday 5th February due to staffing but will reopen as normal on Monday 6th February at 8am.

Research and Development

Research can provide life-changing treatments, diagnose diseases earlier or more accurately and improve health and care for generations to come.

What is research and development for?

Research is asking a new question that can help us increase our knowledge about human health and wellbeing. This is so we can provide life-changing treatments, diagnose diseases earlier or more accurately and improve health and care for generations to come.

Our team’s core aim is to maintain and support a culture of best practice in the management and delivery of research activities within the Trust.

Taking part in high-quality research is one of the many ways that we are committed to providing the most beneficial and cost-effective care and treatment for our patients.

Not all research studies involve testing new medicines or drugs, it may involve completing a questionnaire, having an imaging scan or a blood test, changing lifestyle habits, or using a new medical device.

Getting involved with research

We are a Research Active Trust and you may be approached by a member of staff to ask if you would like to take part. Before participating in a research study, you will be given a Participant Information Sheet to read which explains what the research is about and what will happen throughout the research study. You do not have to decide straight away whether or not you would like to take part, the Information Sheet can be taken home to discuss with family, friends, or GP.

Why Research?

Research is at the heart of advances in treatment and care.  

The goal of research is often to find out if a new treatment, test or approach works, is safe, and is acceptable to the people who are involved in it.  

Research also aims to improve the quality of life for people living with chronic or terminal illnesses, ensuring that people can live the best quality life for the longest amount of time possible.  

Without willing volunteers, research studies will not be able to take place, and these advances in care and treatment will become harder to discover.