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Types of a stroke

A stroke occurs when there is an interruption in the blood supply to the brain.

Some brain cells are temporarily starved of oxygen, causing them to swell and stop working properly. This is why the effects of stroke are worse at the beginning. After a few days, when the swelling starts to go down, some cells recover but others may not. Even then, other parts of the brain can be encouraged to take over. 

There are two main types of stroke:

Ischaemic stroke

This happens when a clot blocks an artery (these carry blood to the brain).

It may be caused by:

  • A blood clot which has formed in a main artery to the brain
  • A blockage, caused by a blood clot, air bubble or fatty lump, forms in a blood vessel somewhere in the body and is carried in the bloodstream to the brain
  • A blockage in the tiny blood vessels in the brain

Haemorrhagic stroke

This happens when a blood vessel in the brain bursts.

It may be caused by:

  • A blood vessel which bursts inside the brain
  • A blood vessel which bursts on the surface of the brain and bleeds into the area between the brain and the skull

 

Call us on 0191 482 0000

In emergencies dial 999 / Non-emergencies dial 111

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